Keeping Babies Safe - A Child Product Safety Organization
Keeping Babies Safe - A Child Product Safety Organization

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State Safe Crib Law Home

Stop! Don't sell or use that crib! It's the law!

You are breaking the law (in Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont and Washington State) if you sell or place in the stream of commerce a crib that has:

  • corner posts that extend more than 1/16-inch above end panels;
  • slats more than 2-3/8 inches apart;
  • a mattress support that releases easily from corner posts;
  • cutout designs on the end panels;
  • tears in mesh or fabric;
  • missing or loose screws, bolts, or hardware;
  • sharp edges, points, or rough surfaces on wood surfaces that are not smooth and free from splinters, splits or cracks.

The Infant Crib Safety Act states that no commercial user shall manufacture, retrofit, sell, contract to sell or resell, lease, sublet or otherwise place in the stream of commerce, a full-size, non-full size crib, or play yard that is unsafe for any infant using the product.

In most of these states this law applies to childcare facilities and hotel/motels. Oregon is the only state in which the law also applies to garage sales.

A commercial user who knowingly violates this law will be subject to a fine of $1,000.00.

Also See:
Senate Approves Feinstein Measure to Prevent Harm to Babies and Young Children from Unsafe Secondhand Cribs


Definition of the Children's Product Safety Act
The Children's Product Safety Act is an act that protects children from dangerous and recalled products on the state-wide level. This Act makes it illegal to sell or lease recalled or dangerous children's products or to use those products in licensed childcare facilities.

In addition to the ban on selling recalled or dangerous children's products or using them in childcare, Illinois has added tough new reporting requirements. This will make it easier for parents and caregivers to learn about dangerous products.

In 1999, through the efforts of Linda Ginzel, Boaz Keysar and KID, Illinois enacted the first Children's Product Safety Act. Since that time, Michigan, Vermont, Louisiana, Arkansas, Missouri New Jersey and Rhode Island have passed similar legislation.

California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, Colorado and Pennsylvania have passed the Infant Crib Safety Act that includes similar language but only applies to cribs.

Urge your state to adopt the Children's Product Safety Act. Read the Model Legislation: Children's Product Safety Act. (pdf document).

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